Rockin’ and shootin’ in the UK

Ah, busy and fun times. Autumn vacation from my day job gives me the chance to hop on a plane and fly away. All the way to the UK, which I love. Sure, visiting the one country where it’s bound to rain more than in Finland in mid-October doesn’t sound too smart, but hey, if the rain comes down on me in London, it’s way better than getting soaked in Turku. (Although I do have to say it’s been gloriously sunny here in my home town lately!)

I’ll be leaving early tomorrow morning, so I don’t yet have any photos from London or anywhere else in the UK. Instead, I’ll use my photos from Crete to make this post a bit more like a post in a photography blog. It’s a post about travel photography after all. These are travel photos.

My very first evening in the Mediterranean, ever. In Chania, Crete.

My very first evening in the Mediterranean, ever. In Chania, Crete.

My schedule on my upcoming trip is rather full packed. First I’m spending a few days in London, meeting people I’ve never met before (mostly fellow photographers from the 365 Project), then dashing out to Nottingham for a day of rock at the 10th annual Firefest rock festival (my friends’ band is the opening act of the whole festival) and then to Cardiff for a bit of Welsh atmosphere and a gig on Sunday. Splendid, methinks.

Sunset in Chania, Crete.

Sunset in Chania, Crete.

With London and the gigs and everything, I’m a bit worried my 64G memory card won’t be enough – had to go and buy a bit of extra memory. But just a bit. Because, to be honest, even the thought of having to edit 2000+ images from a week of traveling… Well, it doesn’t sound like the most fun I could have.

At the hotel Iberostar Creta Panorama, in Panormo, Crete.

At the hotel Iberostar Creta Panorama, in Panormo, Crete.

Travel photography is something I really enjoy. Who wouldn’t? It involves getting out of your own familiar surroundings and seeing places you’ve perhaps never seen before. It’s just such a fresh look into the world, a pair of new eyes almost. I’m sure I’ll be taking the mandatory tourist shots in London, as on my first visit I only had a tiny point&shoot camera with me and I wasn’t really taking photos with as much care back then. I can see there are some thoughts behind some shots, but I think I can afford to say I’ve developed some better skills since. But since I’m meeting a bunch of London based photographers on this coming Thursday, I’m hoping I’ll get some less obvious shots of the city, as well.

Kids fishing in the small village of Panormo in Crete.

Kids fishing in the small village of Panormo in Crete.

The best part of travel photography is, however, the fact that it’s so much more convenient to shoot the souvenirs than to buy them! I can have my wonderful memories printed out on canvas, metal or paper and hang them on my walls. And I don’t have to haul extra weight home in my bags. A sweet deal, really.

Panormo, Crete

Panormo, Crete

And even more so, if (and when) I create a photo book out of the best images. That’s a great way to share a reasonable number of travel photos with your friends and have a great souvenir for yourself. I wouldn’t dream of posting hundreds of images in FB, Flickr or a blog at once, that’d be horrible. But in a book I can show even some less than stellar images that have a meaning to me, some memory of a particular place and time connected to them. But you know how it is with travel photos – mostly they are genuinely interesting to nobody but the person who took them, unless there’s something universally appealing captured in the image. Travel photography wouldn’t be a part of the photography industry unless some people knew how to capture images that truly go above and beyond the standard tourist snaps.

This is, by far, my favourite travel photo to date. I was practically squeeing when I saw those youngsters walking towards the lighthouse, with the lovely sunset behind them.

This is, by far, my favourite travel photo to date. I was practically squeeing when I saw those youngsters walking towards the lighthouse, with the lovely sunset behind them.

Some photographers are geniuses when it comes to bringing the world to your screen through travel photography. The thing seems to be that while most of us just happily snap away when an interesting sight appears, the truly great travel photographers do plan their travel photos just as carefully as someone else would plan a portrait photo. And even though I have no intention to stop shooting “tourist shots” when I’m in places where I am a tourist (nothing wrong with being a tourist, after all), I will make an effort to see the better images around me. Make them happen.

Ha! See what I did there? It’s all about making or taking the photo here in my blog, isn’t it?

It's not going to look like this in London this week! (This is Chania, Crete.)

It’s not going to look like this in London this week! (This is Chania, Crete.)

Anyway, I think I’d better go and finish packing. Traveling light this time, even thought about taking only the 17-70mm with me. It should cover most of my needs anyway. Hmm.

This is going to be so much fun in any case. See you around!

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2 Responses to Rockin’ and shootin’ in the UK

  1. andrewvokes says:

    Found your site off of the 365 project site which i’m on too! I like your photos!

    • Johanna Ahonen says:

      Hey, cool! So sorry I’ve been slow to reply, but it’s definitely good to see fellow 365’ers around! I’ll have a look at your stuff now. 😉

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